Australia will purchase US Tomahawk missiles in order to improve its long-range strike capability.

The Australian Navy’s Hobart Class destroyers will be equipped with Tomahawk missiles, which have a strike range of more than 1,000 kilometres.

The purchase of extremely powerful long-range weapons from the United States has been finalized, Australia confirmed on Monday. As China’s military power grows, Australia is making this move in an effort to counter it.

The purchase will cost $830 million and will contain a stockpile of more than 200 Tomahawk cruise missiles. These missiles are among the most cutting-edge armaments, according to Australia’s defence department.

Australian military forces are currently undergoing a considerable makeover as part of a strategic shift toward improving long-range attack capabilities.

Defence Minister Richard Marles said in a statement that we are making investments in the capabilities our defence force needs to keep our enemies at bay and keep Australians safe in the complicated and unsettling world we now inhabit.

The Australian Navy’s Hobart Class destroyers will be equipped with Tomahawk cruise missiles, which have a strike range of more than 1,000 km (620 miles).

The mobile nuclear-powered submarines that Australia obtained as part of the historic AUKUS treaty will eventually employ them.

The only other nations with sizable inventories of Tomahawk missiles are Australia’s AUKUS allies, the UK, and the US.

These will be essential capabilities for the Australian Defence Force to accomplish its duty of defending Australians as we approach what many are calling the missile age, according to Defence Industry Minister Pat Conroy.

Canberra said in January that it had accepted an offer from the US to additionally purchase HIMARS rockets, the mobile artillery weapon employed to deadly effect by the Ukrainian army.

In an effort to restore supply chains that have been interrupted by the conflict in Ukraine, Washington recently stated that it would assist Australia in developing its own local missile manufacturing industry.

Conroy continued, “We are purchasing these weapons right away to deliver capability quickly.”

However, because it’s crucial to develop independent Australian defence manufacturing capabilities, we are also looking into domestic missile production options.

Recently, the US Army tested a prototype hypersonic cruise missile at the ADF’s weapons range in outback South Australia.

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